Sue Breisch
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There is a reading, taken from the Gates of Prayer a Reformed Jewish prayer book, that goes like this:

At the rising sun and at it's going down –
We will remember them.
At the blowing of the wind and in the chill of winter
We will remember them
At the blueness of the skies and in the warmth of summer
We will remember them.
at the rustling of the leaves and in the beauty of the autumn
We will remember them.
As long as we live, they too will live, for they are now a part of us, as we remember
them.


When we are weary and in need of strength
We will remember them.
When we have decisions that are difficult to make
We will remember them.
when we have joy we crave to share
We will remember them
When we have achievements that are based on theirs
We will remember them.
For as long as we live, they too will live, for they are now a part of us, as we remember
them.


We celebrate Remembrance Day on November 11 each year to allow us to pause from the busyness of our lives and remember the incredible cost of war, the lives that were lost, the families and generations that were impacted, veterans of past wars, and to see the faces of those who yet serve in our armed forces. It is an important day, an important season, and one we are always glad to honour in our Sunday Service.

Jesus also said, “do this in remembrance of me.” He said it as part of the last supper he provided for and ate with his closest friends and disciples. The communion table, which we approach on the first Sunday of every month, is an ongoing reminder that under it all is a deeper remembrance that needs to be part of our Remembrance Day. We are called to remember Jesus, his life, death, and resurrection in every aspect of our lives. Jesus who was the embodiment of God’s love for all humanity, and whose ministry valued all people and sought to challenge division and hatred in the areas where he taught. As followers of Jesus, we honour our veterans while also actively seeking to respond to and overcome division, fear, hatred, and hostility in our own lives and the communities in which we live. This is true Remembrance.

War is the awful result of the very worst of human intentions taking us to the abyss of hatred and destruction. We honour the past, but we are called to remember that EACH of us is responsible for the future. That responsibility begins with today. Where do you see hatred in your world? How can you speak love, healing, and hope to those who need it? What can YOU do to overcome the fear and discomfort in your own life that makes you want to control, resist, or vilify the strangers in your community? What is God calling you to remember during this season of Remembrance?

Jesus came “that they might have life and have it more abundantly”. Abundant life is grounded in remembrance of Jesus, in seeking God’s will in our daily life, and through actively growing in relationship with God every day. It is rooted in a loving vision of others, a desire to be of service to those who are hurting, and the willingness to take action, no matter how difficult, to make sure that the hatred and division required to generate future wars is overcome with a higher vision for humanity. We are all children of God. One people. One family. Let us remember that as well this November and through the months ahead. We are called to be a light in a world that has great need of light. Lets us learn together how to better be that light.